Neuro Health Review: How Safe And Important Is This Product for Dementia?

Neuro Health is a nootropic formula, which claims to boost* the health of your brain and improve* the cognitive functions. It is made from natural extracts, which are safe and effective. Intake of this product will make you have better concentration and be able to handle tough daily activities. This formula will boost* the flow of blood in your brain, enabling all the essential nutrients to reach the brain cells and lead to a better performance. It will also provide your brain cells with the necessary power for proper functioning. This formula will also enhance* your focus, memory, acuity and concentration.

Neuro Health Ingredients List

The ingredients used in this supplement are all natural extracts, and they work to promote proper functioning of your brain.

  • Green Tea Extracts – It increases* flow of blood in your brain leading to more brain power. It also enhances* memory and overall cognitive abilities.
  • Huperzine A – Enhances* memory and increase* mental alertness.
  • Bacopa Monniera – Improves* cognitive function and boost* your brain health.
  • L- Glutamine – It is an amino acid that delivers proteins in your brain and improve* memory.
  • Vitamin A – It supplies your brain with nutrients.
  • Folic Acid – It boosts* flow of blood in your brain.

Advantages

  • Improve Attention & Concentration Levels
  • Boost Cognition & Motor Activity Skills
  • Improve Learning & Behaviour
  • Improve Sleep Patterns
  • Reduce Cravings
  • Improve Mood
  • Maintains alertness by removing brain fog
  • Increases energy levels

Disadvantages

  • Causes migraines to some people

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Neuro Health brain supplement is your answer! Neuro Health seems to work on those people who have problems concentrating or retaining memory.

The mix of ingredients is carefully blended to give you improved brain health and functions. You will also be likely to benefit from brain cell repair and maintenance through the vitamins and amino acids present in Neuro Health. The product is also believed to support memory recall and transfer of energy within the mitochondria.

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The Amazing Life Saving Benefits of Coconut Oil

Today, I would like to express how beneficial coconut oil is to everyone. So I will be talking about the extraordinary benefits of coconut oil, as well as, side effects, what all medical uses coconut oil is for and how to take coconut oil.

To date, there are over 1,500 studies proving coconut oil to be one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Coconut oil benefits and uses go beyond what most people realize.

Most of the fats we consume take longer to digest, but MCFAs found in coconut oil provide the perfect source of energy because they only have to go through a three-step process to be turned into fuel vs. other fats that have to go through a 26-step process!    

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1. Proven Alzheimers Disease Natural Treatment

The digestion of MCFAs by the liver creates ketones that are readily accessible by the brain for energy. Ketones supply energy to the brain without the need of insulin to process glucose into energy.

Recent research has shown that the brain actually creates its own insulin to process glucose and power brain cells. As the brain of an Alzheimer’s patient loses the ability to create its own insulin, the ketones from coconut oil could create an alternate source of energy to help repair brain function.

2. Prevents Heart Disease and High Blood Pressure

Coconut oil is high in natural saturated fats. Saturated fats not only increase the healthy cholesterol (known as HDL cholesterol)  in your body, but also help convert the LDL “bad” cholesterol into good cholesterols.

By increasing the HDL in the body, it helps promote heart health and lower the risk of heart disease. Coconut oil also benefits the heart by lowering high triglycerides.

3. Treats UTI and Kidney Infection and Protects the Liver

Coconut oil has been known to clear up and heal urinary tract infection (UTI) and kidney infections. The MCFAs in the oil work as a natural antibiotic by disrupting the lipid coating on bacteria and killing them. Research also shows that coconut oil directly protects the liver from damage.

Coconut water also helps hydrate and support the healing process. Doctors have even injected coconut water to clear up kidney stones. Coconut is a powerful superfood, which is evident given all these tremendous coconut oil benefits.

4. Reduces Inflammation and Arthritis

In a study in India, the high levels of antioxidants present in virgin coconut oil (VCO) reduced inflammation and treated arthritis more effectively than leading medications.

In another recent study, coconut oil that was harvested with only medium heat was found to suppress inflammatory cells. It worked as both an analgesic and anti-inflammatory.

But, wait that’s not all!

Coconut Oil also Prevents & Treats Cancer, Boost Immune System, Improves Memory & Brain Function, Improves Energy and Endurance, Improves Digestion, Reduces Ulcer & Colitis, Helps Gall Bladder Disease & Pancreatitis, Improves Skin Issues, Prevents Gum Disease& Tooth Decay, Prevents Osteoporosis, Improves Type 2 Diabetes, Helps Weight Loss, Builds Muscle & Decreases Body Fat, Benefits Hair Health, Fights Fungal Infections on the Skin & Yeast Infections, Anti-Aging, and Balances Hormones.

Coconut Oil Side Effects

There are rarely any side effects for coconut oil. Occasionally, a contact allergy may occur for certain individuals that are allergic to coconuts.

coconut oil is known for reducing side effects of many medications. For instance, in studies, it reduced the symptoms and side effects of cancer treatments.

How to Take Coconut Oil

I use coconut oil for all of my cooking and baking. It’s the oil of choice, since unrefined, natural, organic coconut oil adds a nice coconut flavor but does not contain the harmful toxins other hydrogenated cooking oils do.

You can also apply it topically directly to your skin or use for essential oils or blends.

Now that I have provided you all the facts and benefits of Coconut Oil, the many medical uses, minimal side effect, and how to use Coconut Oil, as you can see, everyone on earth needs to be using Coconut Oil for a better life that will help us all live longer. Our health is more important than anything. So, don’t hesitate get yours now.

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Dementia and Cognitive Impairment more Prevalent in Rural than Urban Seniors

Increased educational attainment has helped to mitigate cognitive decline among seniors in rural communities, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Senior woman learning with her elder care nurse

Ann Arbor, MI, December 12, 2017 – Americans who live in urban areas tend to be healthier than individuals living in rural settings. While this healthcare disparity has been examined for more than a decade, researchers present the first nationally representative study to find that dementia and cognitive impairment have consistently been more prevalent among rural dwelling seniors than urban dwelling seniors.

Their findings, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, further suggest that while lagging behind their urban counterparts, the cognitive health of seniors living in rural areas has benefited from early twentieth century investments in secondary education.

“The incidence of dementia is expected to double by 2050 largely because of the aging cohort of Baby Boomers. While many studies to date have focused on individual-level sources of disparity (e.g. racial and ethnic origins), this is the first study to report a rural-urban differential that behooves the scientific and clinical community to address the attendant factors that confer higher risk for dementia in rural seniors,” explained senior investigator Regina Shih, PhD, of the RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA.

sitting in solitude

Using a nationally representative sample of U.S. community-dwelling older adults, more than 16,000 adults aged 55 years or older were evaluated in 2000 and in 2010. Cognitive function was assessed by a 27-point Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status, using multiple validated tests. A score of 6 or less indicated dementia, 7 to 11 indicated cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND), and a score of 12 or more was considered normal cognitive function. Data were gathered by proxy from 8.6% of respondents with significant cognitive impairment in 2000 and 4.8% in 2010.

Individual sociodemographic characteristics were measured, including: age, gender, race, ethnicity, total number of children, marital status, highest educational attainment, and net total assets in 2000. Health conditions including high blood pressure, cancer, diabetes, lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, or psychiatric conditions were taken into account.

Data from 2000 show that cognitive impairment was more prevalent in rural vs. urban areas (7.1% rural vs. 5.4% urban for dementia, and 19.8% rural vs. 15.9% urban for CIND). However, ten years later there were no significant differences in the rates, which had both declined, with a greater decrease in rural than urban areas (5.1% vs. 4.4% and 16.5% vs. 14.9%.  

Concurrent changes in sociodemographic characteristics of rural and urban older adults had also occurred. Racial and ethnic minorities comprised an even larger relative proportion of urban dwellers in 2010, while the proportion of older adults with less than 12 years of education dropped by about half in rural areas between 2000 and 2010.

Once these and other changes were accounted for, the fully adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) was 60% higher for dementia and 44% higher for CIND in rural areas compared to urban areas in 2000. In 2010, similarly high rural-urban differentials were found: RRRs for dementia and CIND were about 80% and 40% higher, respectively, in rural compared to urban areas.

Above and beyond age, race/ethnicity, wealth, and health conditions, the most important factor in reducing the rural-urban disparities over a decades’ time was educational attainment. The researchers found that education was protective against dementia and CIND, yielding between 83% and 89% lower RRR for individuals with more than 12 years of education.

Elderly woman with dementia

“Our findings linking rural adults’ recent gains in cognitive functioning with the improved rates of high school graduation provides a new example of how public investment in education can narrow population health disparities.”

“The absence of any prior evidence about the rates and disparities in dementia and cognitive impairment by rural residence that comes from a large, nationally representative study has certainly hampered the ability of these communities to advocate for continued investment in rural healthcare and long-term care services.”

Dr. Shih added, “”We were heartened to observe that the rural-urban disparities in dementia have narrowed somewhat over time, however there is still a disadvantage that persists among rural seniors. Rural communities are aging more rapidly than urban communities. Given that those communities experience more healthcare and long-term care system challenges, we hope this research sheds light on the need to intervene on the factors that place rural seniors at greater risk for dementia.”

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Does Hearing Loss Contribute to Dementia?

It really doesn’t seem fair: Hearing loss, a troublesome fact of life for more than 48 million Americans, according to the Hearing Loss Association of America, may increase the risk of cognitive problems and even dementia. By the time Americans reach their 70s, two-thirds have hearing loss.

“The general perception is that hearing loss is a relatively part of aging,” says Frank Lin, an otologist and epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. But recent findings, he says, suggest that it may play a much more important role in brain health than we’ve previously thought.

Treating hearing loss more aggressively could help stave off cognitive decline and dementia.  

Lin is the author of several recent studies pointing to a link between hearing and cognitive problems ranging from mild impairment all the way to dementia.

In a 2013 study, he and his colleagues tracked the overall cognitive abilities (including concentration, memory and planning skills) of nearly 2,000 older adults whose average age was 77. After six years, those who began the study with hearing loss severe enough to interfere with conversation were 24 percent more likely than those with normal hearing to see their cognitive abilities diminish. The researchers said, hearing loss seemed to speed up age-related cognitive decline.

Lin and his colleagues monitored the cognitive health of 639 people who were mentally sharp when the study began. The researchers tested the volunteers’ mental abilities regularly, following most for about 12 years, and some for as long as 18 years. The results were striking: The worse the initial hearing loss was, the more likely the person was to develop dementia. Compared with people of normal hearing, those with moderate hearing loss had triple the risk.

Lin is quick to point out that simply being at increased risk does not mean a person is certain to develop dementia.

A recent study, led by Isabelle Mosnier of Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris in France, offers more hope. Mosnier studied a group of 94 people ages 65 to 85 with profound deafness in at least one ear. Each received a cochlear implant followed by twice-weekly auditory rehabilitation. More than 80 percent of those with the lowest cognitive scores showed significant improvement one year after implantation, according to the study published March 12 in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

“The improvement in cognition was huge — about double that seen with any of the current [U.S. Food and Drug Administration] FDA drugs for treating Alzheimer’s.”

“Every doctor knows that hearing loss can result in cognitive problems, but they still don’t focus on it as a priority when they evaluate someone with suspected dementia — which is a big missed opportunity,” Doraiswamy says. “The benefits of correcting hearing loss on cognition are twice as large as the benefits from any cognitive-enhancing drugs now on the market. It should be the first thing we focus on.”

Hearing Aid

4 ways hearing loss can lead to dementia

How might hearing loss contribute to cognitive problems and dementia? Lin suggests four possibilities. The most obvious is a common physiological pathway that contributes to both hearing loss and cognitive decline.

Another possibility has to do with what researchers refer to as “cognitive load” — essentially, that the effort of constantly straining to understand stresses the brain.

“If you put in a lot of effort just to comprehend what you’re hearing, it takes resources that would otherwise be available for encoding [what you hear] in memory,” says Arthur Wingfield, professor of neuroscience at Brandeis University. Research in Wingfield’s lab has documented this effect on a short-term basis. The big question, he says, is whether years of drawing resources away from brain functions such as working memory will eventually reduce the brain’s resilience.

M. Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, a psychologist from the University of Toronto, is conducting research to test the hypothesis that treating hearing loss in those with dementia will help to optimize communication, with positive effects on everyday well-being for the patient and caregivers. “I have no doubt that if a CI [cochlear implant] makes it easier for a person to listen, then they will be able to spend more of their power to do other cognitively demanding tasks.”    

A third factor, Wingfield and Lin suggest, is that hearing loss may affect brain structure in a way that contributes to cognitive problems. Brain imaging studies, Wingfield says, show that older adults with hearing loss have less gray matter in the part of their brain that receives and processes sounds from the ears. “It’s not necessarily that you’re losing brain cells,” he adds. Certain structures of brain cells can shrink when they don’t get enough stimulation. This raises the question, Wingfield says, whether getting clearer speech signals to the brain through use of a modern hearing aid might allow these brain structures to recover their previous size and function.

Finally, it seems very likely that social isolation plays a part. Being hard of hearing tends to isolate people from others: When you have to struggle to converse, you’re less likely to want to socialize in groups or go out to restaurants. And being socially isolated has long been recognized as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia.

Lin and his colleagues have received the first phase of funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to plan and develop a definitive clinical trial that will monitor a large group of older adults with hearing loss. Half will get best-practice hearing treatment, and the other half will get what Lin calls “watchful waiting.” Over the following three to five years, researchers will track the participants’ cognitive functions. The results won’t be available until 2020 at the earliest.

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Does Obesity Increase Dementia Risk?

People who have a high body mass index (BMI) are more likely to develop dementia than those with a normal weight, according to a new UCL-led study.

The study, published in the Alzheimer’s & Dementia journal, analyzed data from 1.3 million adults living in the United States and Europe. The researchers also found that people near dementia onset, who then go on to develop dementia, tend to have lower body weight than their dementia-free counterparts.

“The BMI-dementia association observed in longitudinal population studies, such as ours, is actually attributable to two processes,” said lead author of the study, Professor Mika Kivimäki (UCL Institute of Epidemiology & Health). “One is an adverse effect of excess body fat on dementia risk. The other is weight loss due to pre-clinical dementia. For this reason, people who develop dementia may have a higher-than-average body mass index some 20 years before dementia onset, but close to overt dementia have a lower BMI than those who remain healthy.”

“The new study confirms both the adverse effect of obesity as well as weight loss caused by metabolic changes during the pre-dementia stage.”

Past research on how a person’s weight influences their risk of dementia has produced conflicting results. Some findings have suggested that being obese poses a higher dementia risk, but other studies have linked lower weight to increased dementia incidence.

In this study, researchers from across Europe pooled individual-level data from 39 longitudinal population studies from the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Sweden, and Finland. A total of 1,349,857 dementia-free adults participated in these studies and their weight and height were assessed. Dementia was ascertained using linkage to electronic health records obtained from hospitalization, prescribed medication and death registries.

A total of 6,894 participants developed dementia during up to 38 years of follow-up. Two decades before symptomatic dementia, higher BMI predicted dementia occurrence: each 5-unit increase in BMI was associated with a 16-33% higher risk of this condition (5 BMI units is 14.5kg for a person 5’7″ (170cm) tall, approximately the difference in weight between the overweight and normal weight categories or between the obese and overweight categories). In contrast, the mean level of BMI during pre-clinical stage close to dementia onset was lower compared to that in participants who remained healthy.

In 2015, the number of people with dementia reached almost 45 million, two times more than in 1990. This study suggests that maintaining a healthy weight could prevent, or at least delay, dementia.

Middle age spread raises the risk of dementia by up to a third, a University College London study has found.

A study of more than 1.3 million people found that those with a high body mass index in their 50s were much more likely to develop the neurological condition two decades later.

The research, published in the journal Alzheimer’s And Dementia, found that being overweight leads to a reduced flow of blood to the brain.

Excess body fat is harmful to the cerebrovascular system, the vessels that carry blood to and from the brain. Arteries supply oxygenated blood to the brain, boosting mental function.

Professor Mika Kivimaki, of UCL, explained: “Reduced cerebral flow is obviously one possibility, but there are many other mechanisms, involving for example the quantity and secretory capacity of peripheral white adipose tissue as well as disturbed insulin regulation and its multiple effects on the central nervous system.

“Diabetes, a common consequence of obesity, is associated with numerous metabolic and hemodynamic defects that cause microvascular and macrovascular damage, potentially leading to reduced cerebral flow and impaired vascular reactivity. And so on.

A Cambridge University study published last year found that being overweight in middle-age makes the brain age by 10 years. The study, which scanned 473 brains, found changes in the brain structure of overweight people which are normally seen in those far older.

The volume of white matter – the tissue that connects areas of the brain and allows information to be communicated between regions – shrunk far more in those with a Body Mass Index above 25.

Human brains naturally shrink with age, but scientists are increasingly recognizing that obesity – already linked to conditions such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease – may also affect the onset and progression of brain ageing.

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